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Lee Brice - EXCLUSIVE PREMIERE OF "DRINKING CLASS"

Lee Brice and Curb Records Team Up with iHeartMedia and CMT For the
Exclusive Premiere of “Drinking Class” Today, Thursday, November 13

Nashville, Tenn. – November 13, 2014 – Lee Brice, Curb Records, iHeartMedia and CMT have teamed up to premiere Brice’s latest music video for “Drinking Class,” the second radio single —currently 25 at MediaBase and 23 at Billboard— from the ACM “Song of the Year” winner’s third studio album, ‘I Don’t Dance’ (Sept. 9). The album debuted #1 on the Country Sales chart, #5 on the Billboard 200 and yielded this year’s first RIAA Platinum certified country single with its title track.

Lee’s video will air exclusively across iHeartMedia and CMT platforms including CMT, CMT Pure, CMT Artists app and http://www.cmt.com/videos/lee-brice/1098305/drinking-class.jhtml as well as iHeartMedia’s country station websites and iHeartRadio.com/leebrice today, Thursday, November 13.

The song “heads right down the blue-collar Springsteen highway” (Country Weekly) and its video reflects this theme in gorgeous vignettes of farmers, iron workers, mechanics, teachers, police officers, firefighters and more, shot on location by director Ryan Smith over four days across several small towns in Tennessee.

The “evocative, rough-edged singer” (New York Times) wrote the song with a picture of the American working class in mind. “I wanted to pay tribute to the hard working men and women who get up every day and work hard to provide for their families. It’s where I come from and where my heart is,” says Brice who “might just be the hardest-working man on Music Row” according to American Songwriter magazine.

Lee recorded his third studio album in Nashville, writing and producing 13 of the deluxe edition's 16 songs, and playing almost every instrument on many of the tracks as well. "Nobody in Nashville writes better love songs right now than Brice," says USA Today. Of ‘I Don’t Dance’ the New York Times says, “the songs are sturdy, the mood aching. That’s a noble mode, and a lane Mr. Brice has almost wholly to himself in modern country.”